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Full text of "Mercer University bulletin"

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learning unb |Tabor. 

LIBRARY 



| Universityof Illinois. | 

A CLASS. BOOK. 



VOLUME. A 



Accession No. 



IS 




LIBRARY 

OF TMf 
UNIVERSITY jf ILLINOIS 



CATALOGUE 



AND 



ANNUAL ANNOUNCEMENT 



OF 



MERCER UNIVERSITY 



MACON, GEORGIA. 



•*»so««> 



189 J- 1894. 



BURKE & CO., PRINTERS, MACON, GA. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



Rev. Washington L. Kilpatrick, D. D President. 

E. Y. Maltary, Esq Secretary. 

E. D. Huguenin, Esq Treasurer. 

Hon. Thomas G. Lawson Eatonton, Putnam County. 

Rev. Washington L. Kilpatrick, D. D . Hephzibah, Richmond County 

Hon. William J. Northen Atlanta, Fulton County. 

Benjamin L. Willingham, Esq Macon, Bibb County. 

Rev. Lansing Burrows, D. D Augusta, Richmond County. 

Rev. Brantly M. Callaway, D. D. . , . Washington, Wilkes County. 

Jonh G. McCall, IvL. D Quitman, Brooks County. 

Hon. Alvin D. Freeman Newnan, Coweta County. 

Rev. John G. Gibson, D. D Atlanta, Fulton County. 

James J. Davis, M. D Hephzibah, Richmond County 

J. C. McMichael, Esq Atlanta, Fulton County. 

Rev. Samuel A. Burney, D. D Madison, Morgan County. 

Joseph W. Cabaniss, Esq Macon, Bibb County. 

Rev. T. W. O'KELLEY . . . Griffin, Spalding County. 

Rev. T. J. Holmes Tennille, Washington County. 

E. D. HuGUENlN, Esq. Macon, Bibb County. 

J. W. Stanford, M. D. . . Cuthbert, Randolph County. 

Frank Bloodworth, Esq Savannah, Chatham County. 

Rev. J. G. Chapman, D. D Macon, Bibb County. 

W. C. Paschal, M. D Dawson, Terrell County. 

Calder B. Willingham, Esq Macon, Bibb County. 

Welborn F. Clarke, Esq Americus, Sumter County. 

Rev. S. Y. Jamieson Atlanta, Fulton County. 

E. Y. Maltary, Esq. , Macon, Bibb County. 

Rev. G. S. Tumtin LaGrange, Troup County. 

Rev. Wittiam H. Cooper Cedartown, Polk County. 

Rev. Phitip A. Jessup Cochran, Pulaski County. 

Rev. ALBERT B. Vaughn, Jr Canton, Cherokee County. 

Rev. Benjamin H. Ivey Tennille, Washington County- 

Rev. H. R. Bernard Athens, Clarke County. 

» 
J. D. Stetson, Esq Macon, Bibb County. 



Prudential Committee of the Board of Trustees. 



B. L. WILLINGHAM, J. D. STETSON, 

C. B. WILLINGHAM, J. W. CABANISS. 



Executive Committee of the Georgia Baptist 
Convention. 

Rev. GEORGE BRAXTON TAYLOR, D. D Chairman 

E. D. HUGUENIN, J. D. STETSON, 

E. Y. MALLARY, C. B. WILLINGHAM. 



PERPETUAL CALENDAR. 

SEPTEMBER 19th . . The Faia Term Begins. 

DECEMBER 16th Founder's Day. 

JANUARY rst The Spring Term Begins. 

JUNE 5th Commencement Day. 



64408 



FACULTIES, 



J. B. GAMBRELL, D. D Presidknt. 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS, 



SHELTON P. SANFORD, LL. D., 

Professor Emeritus of Mathematics and Astronomy. 

JOSEPH E. WILLETT, A.M., M. D., LL. D., 

Professor Emeritus of Physics, Chemistry and Geology. 
JOHN J. BRANTLY, D. D., LL. D., 

Professor Emeritus English Literature, Mental and Moral Philosophy. 

E. S. TICHENOR, A. M., 

Professor of Latin Language and Literature. 

J.,S. MURRAY, A. M., 

Professor of Greek Language and IJterature. 

J. F. SELLERS, A. M., 

Professor of Physics, Chemistry and Geology. 

T. J. WOOFTER, A. M., LL. B., 

Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy. 

P. D. POLLOCK, A. M., 

Professor of English Language and Literature. 

J. B. GAMBRELL, D. D., 

Professor of Theology. 

KINGMAN P. MOORE, M. D., 

Professor of Physiology and Hygiene. 

J. C. METCALF, A. M., 

Professor of Modern Languages and Biology. 

J. S. MOSELY, M. S., 

Professor of Pedagogy, Mental and Moral Philosophy. 
EDWARD T. HOLMES, A. B., 

Principal University High School. 



1894.] MERCER UNIVERSITY, MACON, GEORGIA. 



LAW FACULTY. 



Hon. EMORY SPEER, JUDGE U. S. COURT, Chairman. 

Professor Constitutional and International Law and Federal Practice. 

Hon. JOHN P. ROSS, 

Judge City Court of Macon, Principles of Evidence, Criminal Law and Practice. Penal Code. 

OUN J. WIMBERLY, Esq., A. M., 

Of Macon Bar, Equity Jurisprudence, Pleading. Code of Practice. 

CLEM P. STEED, ESQ., A. M., 

Of Macon Bar, Common and Statute Law. The Civil Code. 



LECTURERS. 



Hon. WALTER B. HILL, 

The Study of Law and Professional Ethics. 

Hon. C. A. TURNER, 

On the Conduct of Causes. 

Dr. HOWARD J. WILLIAMS, 

Medical Jurisprudence. 



MERCER UNIVERSITY, MACON, GEORGIA. [1893. 



CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS, 



SENIOR CLASS. 



NAME. RESIDENCE. 

Allen, MOSES Young Upson county, Georgia. 

Alsop, John T Bibb county, Georgia. 

Bagwell, John Spurgeon . Gwinnett county, Georgia. 

Bennett, John Walter Ware county, Georgia. 

Brinson, Frederick Oscar Gordon county, Georgia. 

Coates, Howard Elliott Bibb county, Georgia. 

Culver, LESTER Hancock county, Georgia. 

Curd, Richard Bibb county, Georgia. 

Cutts, William Loomis Terrell county, Georgia. 

Dodd, JESSE MERCER Campbell county, Georgia. 

Dodd, James Edward Campbell county, Georgia. 

Dodd, Rufus LEE Campbell county, Georgia. 

Graham, Balus Joseph Winger . . . Bibb county, Georgia. 

Gray, Claude . •..'•' Butts county, Georgia. 

GuillEbeau, John Lucius Lincoln county, Georgia. 

Hogan, Luther Rice . . Lincoln county, Georgia. 

Holland, Ezekiel ..... ... Gwinnett county, Georgia. 

Hudson, Leroy Olney Jackson county, Georgia. 

Johns, George Alexander, Jr . . . . Walton county, Georgia. 

Johns, William S . . Walton county, Georgia. 

KEESE, William S Randolph county, Georgia. 

McAeee, John Colbert Bibb county, Georgia. 

McCall, Henry Bunn . Bibb county, Georgia. 

McElmurray, Francis Lorraine . . . Burke county, Georgia. 

Milikin, Charles B . ...... Appling county, Georgia. 

Miller, James Ira DEESE Bibb county, Georgia. 

Nichols, William E • ■ • • Randolph county, Georgia. 

O'KELLEY, Nathaniel Boaz . . . . . . Hall county, Georgia. 

Powell, Richard Holmes, Jr Early county, Georgia. 

Skannal, Abel CunyerS Bartow county, Georgia. 

Skannal, Henry L Bartow county, Georgia. 

Small, Idus Brown Sumter county, Georgia. 

Smith, Lindsey Gillespie Henry county, Georgia. 

WHEELER, Wallace Polhill .... Bibb county, Georgia. 

White, Mark Johnson Jones county, Georgia. 



i8 9 4 ] MERCER UNIVERSITY, MACON, GEORGIA. 



JUNIOR CLASS. 

NAME. RESIDENCE. 

Alfriend, Kyle Terry Haucock county, Georgia. 

Bennett, John Cayenor Appling county, Georgia. 

Benton, Elias . Bryan county, Georgia. 

Brown, Denyer B Hart county, Georgia. 

Cates, Otis Mitchell ... Spalding county, Georgia. 

ChamleE, Aouila Cherokee county, Georgia. 

Cone, Linton . Bulloch county, Georgia. 

Evans, John A. Houston count}-, Georgia. 

Fort, William Edwards Early county, Georgia. 

Green, Dayid Ebenezer Laurens county, Georgia. 

Hatcher, Marshall FelTon Bibb county, Georgia. 

Hurst, Needham Washington . . . Bibb county, Georgia. 

Lawrence, Henry James Jasper county, Georgia. 

Massey, Milo Hatch Washington county, Georgia. 

Nash, Ried C. . Lincoln county, Georgia. 

Osborne, Edward Reid Hancock county, Georgia. 

Parker, Charles Henry Liberty county, Georgia. 

Sanford, Charles Dickerman .... Bibb county, Georgia. 

Small, Ralph B . Bibb county, Georgia. 

Smith, George Washington, Jr. . . Houston county, Georgia. 

Strickland, Judson Martin Pike county, Georgia. 

Swint, Roger Carlos Washington county, Georgia. 

Williams, Juhan Hartridge Tattnall county, Georgia. 



SOPHOMORE CLASS. 



Arnall, John Thomas Coweta county, Georgia. 

Campbell, Walter Robert Harris county, Georgia. 

Cargile, John Forsyth Bibb county, Georgia. 

Childs, Earnest Walker Jones county, Georgia. 

Connell, Edwin Lewis . . ..... Carroll county, Georgia. 

Crummey, Elias Cameron . Wayne county, Georgia. 

Dunn, Chas. J Spalding county, Georgia. 

Durden, Chauncey W Hancock county, Georgia. 

Dwight, GEORGE LEE Macon county, Georgia. 

Freeman, Cullen Bibb county, Georgia. 

Getzen, John Henry Bibb county, Georgia. 

Goodman, Samuel Americus Harris county, Georgia. 

Grice, Josiah Warren Pulaski county, Georgia. 

Grimes, Frank N Bulloch county, Georgia. 

Hall, William Andrew ; . Gordon county, Georgia. 

Harris. Jessie C Bibb county, Georgia. 

Hart, Walter Nathaniel Bibb county, Georgia. 

Heard, J. M. Jr Houston county, Georgia. 



io MERCER UNIVERSITY, MACON, GEORGIA. [1893. 

SOPHOMORE CLASS-Continued. 

NAME. RESIDENCE. 

Holmes, Chart.es Ellis Washington county, Georgia. 

Hudson, Mike DeKalb county, Georgia. 

Jenkins, W. E Harris county, Georgia. 

Jones, Willis B. Carroll county, Georgia. 

Lagerquist, Charles Oscar Bibb county, Georgia. 

Leake, Howeee Gareington Bibb county, Georgia. 

Lide, John Wieeiamson DeKalb county, Georgia. 

Lord, Joseph M Washington county, Georgia. 

Mathews, Charees Brooks . ... Pike county, Georgia. 

McCaee, John FRank Brooks county, Georgia. 

McCoy, Andrew James ........ Twiggs county, Georgia. 

Mooney, Aefonzo J Tattnall county, Georgia. 

Napier, Leroy Walker county, Georgia. 

Napier, Augustus Y Walker county, Georgia. 

OSTEEN, WiEEiS M Bryan county, Georgia. 

Paemour, James Ernest Hall county, Georgia. 

Rabun, James David Warren county, Georgia. 

Sanford, Jordan Howeee Burke county, Georgia. 

Searcy, James Kinchen Talbot county, Georgia. 

Smith, Louis Gieman . .. . Bibb county, Georgia. 

Smith, Frederick Augustus Telfair county, Georgia. 

StapeETon, Newton Lawson Terrell county, Georgia. 

Stone, Jueian J Hancock county, Georgia. 

Whitehead, Henry . Bibb county, Georgia. 

Winship, Wieeiam HERRING Bibb county, Georgia. 

Winn, WieeiE J Putnam county, Georgia. 



FRESHMAN CLASS. 



Adam, EeTon MaThis Bibb county, Georgia. 

Ayer, Ernest Crittenden Marion county, Florida. 

BuTEER, Thomas King Mitchell county, Georgia. 

Cabaniss, Joseph Warren Bibb county, Georgia. 

Chieds, Ceaudius C Jones county, Georgia. 

Cochran, Thomas J Meriwether county, Georgia. 

Davis, James Madison Wilkinson county, Georgia. 

Fowler, Frank James Putnam county, Florida. 

Gibson, Boyt Monroe county, Georgia. 

Giereath, Frank C Bartow county, Georgia. 

Grice, Herbert Landrum Pulaski county, Georgia. 

Hammontry, Joseph Putnam county, Florida. 

Harris, Nat. E Bibb county, Georgia. 

Hoemes, Clarence Washington county, Georgia. 

Johnson, Henry R., Jr Sumter county, Georgia. 

Jones, Otis Coweta county, Georgia. 



1894-1 MERCER UNIVERSITY, MACON, GEORGIA. 



FRESHMAN CLASS— Continued. 

NAME. RESIDENCE. 

Kendrick, Thomas Clarence Muscogee county, Georgia. 

Kent, William Bryant ....... Montgomery county, Georgia. 

Kinsey, John Stephens Catoosa county, Georgia. 

Marshall, Chesley Brown ..... Taylor county, Georgia. 

Mayes, John Crowder Butts county, Georgia. 

McArthur, Bruce A Montgomery county, Georgia. 

McKenney, Joshua L. Cobb county, Georgia. 

McTyre, Leonidas E Decatur county, Georgia. 

Mooney, Benjamin S Tatnall county, Georgia. 

Moore, George M Houston county, Georgia. 

Moore, K. Colquitt Bibb county, Georgia. 

Napier, George Reed Bibb county, Georgia. 

Napier, Joseph Moultrie Bibb county, Georgia. 

Norris, Thomas L . Baker county, Georgia. 

Pounds, J. E Pike county, Georgia. 

REEVES, Henry Meriwether county, Georgia. 

Rogers, John Mitchell Gordon county, Georgia. 

Rogers, Richard Morrison Bibb county, Georgia. 

Rowe, M. G Madison county, Florida. 

Sanford, William Daniel Burke county, Georgia. 

Taylor, L,onnie James Muscogee county, Georgia. 

Wagner, Willie Forest Jasper county, Georgia. 

Walker, Clarence E Richmond county, Georgia. 

Webb, Francis Marion Sumter county, Georgia. 



SUB-FRESHMAN CLASS. 



Allen, George D., Jr Bibb county, Georgia. 

Ayer, HALCOTT Bibb county, Georgia. 

Chambers, Idus Bibb county, Georgia. 

Chiles, Joseph Hascal Columbia county, Florida. 

Corbin, Samuel Jaques Bibb county, Georgia. 

Ellis, Theodore W Bibb county, Georgia. 

Ellis, Charles Benjamin Bibb county, Georgia. 

Fulghum, Clifford A Bibb county, Georgia. 

Gaines, David R Bartow county, Georgia. 

Gilland, Stephen Carroll county, Georgia. 

Glover, Joseph H . Bibb county, Georgia. 

Gostin, Barnard Singleton Bibb county, Georgia. 

Gray, A. T Bibb county, Georgia. 

Hammond, Taswell, M Carroll county, Georgia. 

Harkin, Walter Newton Jones county, Georgia. 

Holcomb, Marshall B. Bibb county, Georgia. 

JESTER, John Roberts Stewart county, Georgia. 

Johnson, Herbert D Bibb county, Georgia. 



MERCER UNIVERSITY, MACON, GEORGIA. [1893. 



SUB-FRESHMAN CLASS—CONTINUED. 

NAME. RESIDENCE. 

Johnson, Newton Alacheea county, Florida. 

Lawton, Furman D . . Bibb county, Georgia. 

Mau^ary, Eugene P Bibb county, Georgia. 

Martin, Marion Bibb county, Georgia. 

McCael, Aeva Carnett Hamilton county, Florida. 

Moncrief, Adiee J Bibb county, Georgia. 

Moughon, Thomas Jones county, Georgia. 

Murrow, Jonathan B. ........ Worth county, Georgia. 

Murrow, Joseph S. . . . Bryan county, Georgia. 

Porter, Cearence C. ..... Bibb county, Georgia. 

Rouck, Edwin C Bibb county, Georgia. 

Ryder, T. C. Muscogee county, Georgia. 

Turner, Aeeen Bibb county, Georgia. 

Virgin, James Holt Bibb county, Georgia. 

Worthen, Macon, Jr., Washington county, Georgia. 

Watkins, Charees Z. N Macon county, Georgia. 

Wieder, Joseph J Bibb county, Georgia. 

Wieeiamson, WiEEiE Bibb county, Georgia. 

Wieeingham, Leon Keee ....... Bibb county, Georgia. 

IRREG-ULARS. 

Smith, Wieeiam T. Jones county, Georgia. 

Ivey, W. H. S Bibb county, Georgia. 



HEARN SCHOOL, i8 9 ?-9 4 . 



Richard R. Asbury Cave Spring, Georgia. 

Rogers Asbury Cave Spring, Georgia. 

J. M. Barnett Reeves' Station, Georgia. 

J. Edgar Brown , . . Cave Spring, Georgia. 

Ceaude Baker Cave Spring, Georgia. 

Leo Baker t . Cave Spring, Georgia. 

Luther Baker Cave Spring, Georgia. 

Waeter Baker • Cave Spring, Georgia. 

Asa B. Carnes . Pryor's Station, Georgia. 

Benson Camp Cave Spring, Georgia. 

EEEiS Dickerson Cave Spring, Georgia* 

Paue H. DoieE • . * ' . Floyd county, Georgia. 

D. W. Erquhart ... Haralson, Georgia. 

Charles Eason Cave Spring, Georgia. 

Orrin Evans Cave Spring, Georgia. 

T. DeWitt Farris Cave Spring, Georgia. 

GoREE Farris Cave Spring, Georgia. 

Earnest Farris Cave Spring, Georgia. 

Fred. Farris Cave Spring, Georgia. 



[894.] MERCER UNIVERSITY, MACON, GEORGIA. 13 



HEARN SCHOOL— Continued. 

NAME. RESIDENCE. 

Charles Graham Cave Spring, Georgia. 

Albert S. Gray Cave Spring, Georgia. 

JESSE George Cave Spring, Georgia. 

Robert Grimes Cave Spring, Georgia. 

Munford Gilreath Cave vSpring, Georgia. 

John A. Glenn Cave Spring, Georgia. 

Thomas Hendricks . Cave Spring, Georgia. 

Pinkney Hendricks Cave Spring, Georgia. 

John A. Hill . • • Cave Spring, Georgia. 

Charles HighT . . Cave Spring, Georgia. 

James M. Haygood Walker county, Georgia, 

Charles K. Henderson, Jr Birmingham, Alabama. 

Charles Kelley . . Anniston, Alabama. 

Oscar Kelley . Anniston, Alabama. 

J. T. Latham ... Cave Spring, Georgia. 

John Ledbetter Cave Spring, Georgia. 

R. H. Maddox . Acworth, Georgia. 

Clayton McMichael Bartow, Florida. 

Lonnie McCormick Anniston, Alabama. 

Ralph Minhinnett Cave Spring, Georgia. 

Frank Miller ... Cave Spring, Georgia. 

Jack Montgomery Cave Spring, Georgia. 

Green Montgomery Cave Spring, Georgia. 

Clarence Montgomery . Agate, Georgia. 

George Proctor . Rome, Georgia. 

Frank R. Park Cave Spring, Georgia. 

James E. Reeves Cave Spring, Georgia. 

Walter Reeves Cave Spring, Georgia. 

HERBERT Reeves Cave Spring, Georgia. 

Earl B. Rakestraw Cave Spring, Georgia. 

David E. Reynolds . . Floyd county, Georgia. 

P. B. Simms Melson, Georgia. 

Fred. Simms .... Cave Spring, Georgia. 

Capers Simmons .... Cave Spring, Georgia. 

Henry H. Sparks Cave Spring, Georgia. 

Benjamin Strickland Cave Spring, Georgia. 

Starling Striplin. ... ... Cave Spring, Georgia. 

Charles Striplin . Cave Spring, Georgia. 

Thomas B. Watts Cave Spring, Georgia. 

William T. Williman Cave Spring, Georgia. 

John Williman . Cave Spring, Georgia. 

Rich W t right Cave Spring, Georgia. 

Thomas M. Williams Cave Spring, Georgia. 

James C. Walker Cave Spring, Georgia. 



i 4 MERt. 'ER ( 'AY / 'ERSITY, MACON, GEORGIA. [1893. 

THEOLOGICAL CLASS. 

MiLLER, J. I. D Bibb county, Georgia. 

Ivev, William T Florida. 

Reese, W. S Randolph county, Georgia. 

CuARir.EE, A. C. . . . . Cherokee county, Georgia. 

Graham, B. J. W. . . Bibb county, Georgia. 

Guillebeau, J. L Lincoln county, Georgia. 

Hudson, L. O Jackson county, Georgia. 

Dodd, \V. E Campbell county, Georgia. 

Dodd, J. M Campbell county, Georgia. 

Nichols, W. E. Randolph county, Georgia. 

Benton, E Bryan county, Georgia. 

Massev, H. M . . . ' Washington county, Georgia. 

Osborne, E. R Hancock county, Georgia. 

HuRST, N. W. . . . Bibb county, Georgia. 

O'KELLEV, N. B. ........... . Hall county, Georgia. 

CuTTS, W. L. . Terrell county, Georgia. 

Green, David E Laurens county, Georgia. 

Note. — There were in all, thirty students in Mercer studying with a 
view to the ministry. 



LA W CLASS. 

Aver, M. H , . . . Florida. 

Bagwell, John S. Gwinnett county, Georgia. 

Bennett, John W Ware county, Georgia. 

Dodd, Rufus L. .......... Campbell county, Georgia. 

Callaway, Merrill P Bibb county, Georgia. 

Chapman, Augustus M Bibb county, Georgia. 

Jones, Frederick R. ........ Bibb county, Georgia. 

Gambrell, Eric C. Bibb county, Georgia. 

Morecock, J. Cooper . . .... Bibb county, Georgia. 

Smith, John Wall . • • . . . Telfair county, Georgia. 

Van Houten, Walter E • . Bibb county, Georgia. 

Van HouTEN, J. K. . Bibb county, Georgia. 

WaTkins, Darden Butts county, Georgia. 

Ivev, W. S Marion county, Florida. 



:8 9 4-] MERCER UNIVERSITY, MACON, GEORGIA. 



15 



SUMMARY. 



Sknior Class 35 

Junior Class 23 

Sophomore Class 44 

Freshman Class 40 

Sub-Freshman 37 

Irregular 2 

Theological Class 17 

Law Class • 14 

Hearn School 64 

276 

Counted twice 24 



DEGREES CONFERRED. 



Allen, Moses Young, A. B. 
Bagwell, John S., A. B., B. L. 
Bennett, John W., A. B., B. L. 
Brinson, Frederick O., A. B. 
Carter, W. W., A. M. 
Chapman, J. P., D. D. 
Coates, Howard Elliott, A. B. 
Cutts, William Loomis, B. S. 
Dodd, James Edward, A. B. 
Dodd, Jesse Mercer, a. b. 
Dodd, Rufus Lee, A. B., B. L. 
Gambrell, Eric C, B. L. 
Graham, Baylus J. W., A. B. 
Gray, Claude, A. B. 
Hogan, Luther Rice, A. B. 
Holland, Ezekiel, A. B. 
Hudson, Lery Olney, A. B. 
Johns, W. S., A. B. 
Johns, G. A., A. B. 



Jones, Frederick R., B, L. 
Keese, William Shelton, A. B. 
McAfee, John Calyert, A. B. 
McCall, J. G., LL. D. 
McConnell, F. C, D. D. 
McElmurray, Francis L., A. B. 
Morecock, J. Cooper, B. L. 
Nichols, William Elbert, A. B. 
O'Kelley, Nathaniel B., A. B. 
Powell, Richard Holmes, A. B. 
Rogers, Z. B., A. B. 
Skannall, Abel Cunyus, A. B. 
Skannall, Henry Lloyd, A. B. 
Smith, Lindsey Gillespy, A. B. 
Smith, John Wall, B. L. 
Taylor, George Braxton, D. D. 
Van Houten, Walter E., B. L. 
Wheeler, Wallace Polhill, A. B. 
White, Mark Johnson, A. B. 



I. HONORS IN GRADUATING CLASS. 

FIRST HONOR— Valedictory. 

R. H. Powell, Jr . Early county, Georgia. 

SECOND HONOR— Latin Salutatory. 
H. E. Coates .Bibb county, Georgia. 



16 MERCER UNIVERSITY, MACON, GEORGIA. [1893. 

II. MEDALS FOR ORATORY. 

JUNIOR ORATORY. 
W. E. Fort Early county. Georgia. 

SOPHOMORE DECLAMATION. 

J. H. Sanford, (First Medal) Burke county, Georgia. 

J. C. Harris, (Second Medal) Bibb county, Georgia. 

FRESHMAN DECLAMATION. 
W. D. Sanford, (Cabaniss Medal) .... Burke county, Georgia. 

SUB-FRESHMAN DECLAMATION. 
A. J. Moncrief, (Freeman Medal) . . . . Bibb county, Georgia. 

III. MEDAL FOR COMPOSITION. 

W. E. Nichols, (McMichael Medal) . . Randolph county, Georgia. 

IV. MEDAL FOR MODEL STUDENT. 
W. E. Fort, (McCall Medal) Early county, Georgia. 

V. MEDAL FOR SUPERIORITY IN GREEK, Junior. 
J, C. Bennett, (O'Kelly Medal) Appling county, Georgia. 

V!. UNIVERSITY SCHOLARSHIP. 

Fv. P. Malxary Bibb county, Georgia. 

ROLL OF SPECIAL DISTINCTION. 

SENIOR CLASS, 

H. E. Coates, Claude Gray, L. P. Hogan, 

C. B. Miukin, R. H. Powell. 

JUNIOR CLASS. 

D. E. Green, R. B. Small. 

SOPHOMORE CLASS. 

G. L. Dwight, F. N. Grimes, J. C. Harris, 

A. J. Mooney, A Y. Napier, W. M. Osteen, 

J. H. Sanford. 

FRESHMAN CLASS. 

T. J. Fowler. 



1 894.] MERCER UNIVERSITY, MACON, GEORGIA. 17 



ORGANIZATION. 



The University is organized into ten separate schools, as 
follows : 

I. The School of Latin Language and Literature. 

II. The School of Greek Language and Literature. 

III. The School of English Language and Literature. 

IV. The School of Modern Languages. 

V. The School of Mathematics and Astronomy. 

VI. The School of Natural History. 

VII. The School of Physics and Chemistry. 

VIII. The School of Pedagogy. 
Lectures. 

IX. The School of Theology and Biblical Literature. 

X. The School of Law. 

Students can enter as many schools as they choose, under 
the advice of the Faculty. The accompanying schedules will 
show the courses leading to degrees. Any student completing 
one or more schools, but not a sufficient number to take a degree, 
will receive a certificate of proficiency in those schools. 



COURSE OF STUDY, 



SCHOOL OF LATIN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 
Professor Tichenor. 



FRESHMAN CLASS. 

First Term.- Nepos; Grammar (Gildersleeve); Composition (Collar); 
Roman History (Allen). 

Second Term. — Cicero's Orations; Grammar; Composition ; Roman 
History. 



i8 MERCER UNIVERSITY, MACON, GEORGIA. [1893. 



SOPHOMORE CLASS. 



First Term. — Ovid's Metamorphoses; Principles of Prosody and Exer- 
cises in Scanning; Composition (Collar); Grammar; Mythology. 

Second Term. — Horace's Satires and Odes ; Scanning ; Composition ; 
Grammar ; Mythology. 



JUNIOR CLASS. 



First Term. — Livy ; Grammar ; Original Exercises ; History of Roman 

Literature (Wilkins). 
Second Term. — Tacitus ; Grammar ; Original Exercises ; History of 

Roman Literature. 



SENIOR CLASS. 



First Term. — Plautus or Terence ; Grammar ; Original Exercises ; 

Roman Antiquities (Wilkins). 
Second Term. — One of Cicero's Philosophical Works ; Original Exer- 
cises ; Roman Antiquities. 
The following works of reference are recommended for all, but more 
especially for the Junior and Senior classes : 

Grammars — Harkness, Ai,i,en and Greenough. 
Classical Atlas— Ginn. 
Dictionary — Harper. 
The Roman method of pronunciation will be used. 



SCHOOL OF GREEK LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 
Professor Murray. 



FRESHMAN CLASS. 



First Term. — Xenophon's Anabasis; First Lessons in Greek (White); 

Grammar (Goodwin); Greek History (Myers). 
Second Term. — Xenophon's Memorabilia or Symposium ; First Lessons 

in Greek (White) ; Grammar ; Greek History. 



SOPHOMORE CLASS. 



First Term. — Selections from Herodotus ; Ionic Dialect (Stein) ; Greek 
Prose Composition; Grammar (Goodwin); Mythology (White). 

Second Term. — Homer's Iliad or Odyssey ; Greek Prose Composition ; 
Grammar ; Mythology. 



i8 9 4.] MERCER UNIVERSITY, MACON, GEORGIA. 19 



JUNIOR CLASS. 



First Term. — Lysias or Plato; Greek Prose Composition (Sidgwick); 

Grammar; Greek Moods and Tenses (Goodwin); Greek Antiquities. 
Second Term. — Demosthenes or Thucidides ; Greek Prose Composition 

(Sidgwick); Grammar; Greek Moods and Tenses (Goodwin); 

Greek Antiquities. 



SENIOR CLASS. 



First Term. — A Drama of Sophocles or Plato ; Study of Greek Metres ; 
Greek Prose Composition (Sidgwick); Grammar; Greek Moods 
and Tenses (Goodwin); Primer of Greek Literature (Jebb), supple- 
mented by lectures. 

Second Term. — Aristophanes or Euripides ; Greek Metres ; Greek Prose 
Composition; Grammar; Greek Moods and Tenses (Goodwin); 
Greek Literature. 

The following works of reference are recommended, especially to the 
mora advanced classes : 

Liddell and Scott's Lexicon (seventh edition); Hamilton's English- 
Greek Lexicon ; Veitch's Greek Verbs ; Smith's Classical Dictionary ; 
Ginn & Co.'s Classical Atlas ; Grote's History of Greece. 

Approved annotated editions of the texts which are read will be recom- 
mended to the classes. 



SCHOOL OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 
Professor Pollock. 



FRESHMAN CLASS. 



First Term.— Elements of Composition and Rhetoric (Waddy); English 
Literature (Gilman); Essays twice a month; Declamation. 

Second Term.— Elements of Composition and Rhetoric (Waddy) 
English Literature (Gilman); Essays once a month ; Declamation 
Reading in Class-room : The Story of English Literature (White) 
Required Reading : Irving's Sketch Book, Knickerbocker, and 
Life of Goldsmith ; Goldsmith's Deserted Village, and Vicar of 
Wakefield. 



SOPHOMORE CLASS. 



First Term. — History of English (Champney), Anglo Saxon Primer 
(Sweet); American Literature (Smyth); Essays twice a month; 
Declamation. 



MERCER UNIVERSITY, MACON, GEORGIA. [1893. 



Second Term.— History of English (Champney); Anglo Saxon Primer 
(Sweet); English and American Literature (Raub); Essays once a 
month; Declamation; Required Reading : Selected Classics from 
American Authors; Thackery's English Humorists, and Henry 
Esmond ; Addison's Essays. 



JUNIOR CLASS. 



First Term.— First Book in Old English (Cook); Genung's Rhetoric;. 
Essays once a month ; Declamation. 

Second Term.— First Book in Old English (Cook); Genung's Rhetoric ;. 
Historical English Grammar (Morris); Reading in Class-room, 
Emerson's Essays ; Essays once a month ; Declamation ; Required 
Reading: Adam Bede ; Ward's English Poets (Vol. IV.); Church's 
Bacon ; Bacon's Essays ; Macaulay's Essays on Milton, Johnson 
and Goldsmith. 



SENIOR CLASS. 

First Term. — Philosophy of Style (Spencer); Chaucer's Prologue of 
Canterbury Tales (Carpenter); Spenser's Faery Queene, Book I. 
(Percival); Essays. 

Second Term. — English of Shakespeare (Craik); Milton's Paradise Lost, 
Books I. and II., and Lycidas (Sprague). Required Reading: 
Shakespeare as a Dramatic Artist (Moulton); Three of Shake- 
speare's Plays; English Prose from Elizabeth to Victoria (Garnett);. 
Reference Book : Minto's English Prose Literature. 

The Senior course will be supplemented during the year with lectures 
on Italian Literature (5); Spanish Literature (5); French Literature (5)^ 
German Literature (5). 



SCHOOL OF MODERN LANGUAGES. 
Professor MetcaeE. 



SOPHOMORE CLASS. 



I. FRENCH. 

First Term. — Van Daell's Introduction to the French Language; Daily- 
Exercises ; Super's Preparatory French Reader. 

SECOND Term. — Grammar and Exercises ; Lamartine's Jeanne d'Arc,.. 
Sand's La Famille de Germandre. 



J894-1 MERCER UNIVERSITY, MACON, GEORGIA. 



JUNIOR CLASS. 



First Term. — Whitney's Grammar ; Selections from the works of 
Daudet and Victor Hugo ; Weekly Written Exercises. 

Second Term. — Advanced Grammar and Exercises ; Three Plays each 
of Racine and Moliere, Memoires de Saint-Simon or Sainte-Beuve's 
Causeries du Lundi ; Warren's French Literature. Private reading 
required throughout the year. 



SOPHOMORE CLASS. 



II. GERMAN. 

First Term. — Collar's Eysenbach's Lessons ; Daily exercises in Read- 
ing, Writing and Speaking ; Brandt's German Reader. 

Second Term. — Grammar and Exercises ; Schiller's Die Jungfrau or 
Storm's Immensee. 



JUNIOR CLASS. 

First Term. — Whitney's Grammar ; Stein's Exercises ; Schiller's Maria 
Stuart ; Goethe's Iphigenie or Egmont ; Lectures on German Lit- 
erature. 

Second Term. — Advanced Grammar and Exercises ; Keller's Dectegen ; 
Selections from Heine and from Goethe's Dictung und Wahrheit ; 
Lectures on German Literature. Private reading required through- 
out the course. 



SCHOOL OF MATHEMATICS AND ASTRONOMY. 
Professor Woofter. 



This school comprises two years in the University High 
School, or Preparatory Department, and four years in the 
University. 

In the University High School, the course includes Arith- 
metic, Elementary Algebra, University Algebra through simple 
equations, and Geometry, through the first two books of WelFs 
Eevised or Wentworth's Geometry, including the original the- 
orems and exercises. These original exercises should not be 
omitted by any preparing for the University classes, for through- 
out the course independent thought and original investigation 
will be emphasized, and nowhere else are these of greater impor- 
tance than at the beginning. 



MERCER UNIVERSITY, MACON, GEORGIA. [1893, 



The work in the University classes will be arranged as 
follows : 

FRESHMAN. First Term.— Beginning with quadratic equations, the 
study of Algebra is finished. (Well's University Algebra). 

Second Term.— Beginning with the third book, Plane and Solid Geom- 
etry with applications to Mensuration will be completed. (Well's 
Revised or Wentworth's Geometry.) 

SOPHOMORE. First Term— Plane and Spherical Trigonometry with 

applications. (Wentworth's). 
Second Term.— Analytic, or General Geometry, the point, line, circle, 

and conic sections. (Wentworth's). 

JUNIOR. First and Second Terms.— Differential and Integral Calcu- 
lus. (Taylor's). 

SENIOR. First Term.— General Astronomy (Young's Elements). 
Second Term. — Plane Surveying, including field work, plotting, divid- 
ing land, etc. (Carhart's). 
The course in Surveying is not required, except for the degree B. S. 

The University has for equipments in this department, an 
excellent Surveyor's Transit, Surveyor's Compass, Engineer's 
leveling outfit, two Astronomical Telescopes, a refractor and a 
reflector, and other mathematical and astronomical instruments. 



SCHOOL OF NATURAL HISTORY. 
Professor Metcaef. 



ZOOLOGY AND BOTANY. 



Candidates for the B. S. degree will study, during the Fresh- 
man year, Zoology the first term, and Botany the second term. 

First Term. — Orton's Comparative Zoology. 
Second Term.— Gray's Botany. 



1 894.] MERCER UNIVERSITY, MACON, GEORGIA. 23 

GEOLOGY. 
Professor SELLERS. 

Geology will be studied by candidate for both the A. B. and 
B. S. degrees during the second term of the Senior year. 

Special attention is given to the Geology of Georgia. Many 
fossils have been collected from various parts of Georgia and 
other States. These, with minerals, rocks, and other fossils in 
museum are used for illustration in the study of Geology. 

Text-Books in Geology : LeConte's Elements of Geology ; Geologi- 
cal Survey of Georgia ; Dana's Manual of Geology. 



SCHOOL OF PHYSICS AND CHEMISTRY. 
Professor SELLERS. 



PHYSICS. 



Students of the Senior class, who are candidates for both the 
A. B. and B. S. degrees, study Physics during the entire session. 
The work of the first term is Mechanics, Hydraulics, Pneumatics 
and Acoustics. During the second term, Optics, Heat and Elec- 
tricity are studied. 

The University has a good supply of apparatus with which 
to illustrate these subjects, and daily experiments are performed 
both by the student and the instructor. 

As many of the laws of Physics have been reduced to mathe- 
matical formula, and as most of the text-books on the subject 
are based on theories of heat and light which were adopted fifty 
years ago, many regard Physics as a deductive science. The 
conclusion is too hastily drawn, for the reason that many of the 
wonderful discoveries of Gray, Edison, Bell and Tyndall belong 
to the last two decades. For this reason, it is deemed wise to 
allow students to investigate for themselves as much as possible 
by doing practical work in the laboratory. 

Text-Books: Olmstead's College Philosophy (fourth revision); 
Ganot's Physics ; Tyndall's Lectures ; Thompson's Magnetism and Elec- 
tricity ; Day's Electrical Measurements. 



24 MERCER UNIVERSITY, MACON, GEORGIA. [1893. 

CHEMISTRY. 

Candidates for the A. B. degree study Chemistry one year, 
and candidates for the B. S. degree study Chemistry two years. 

The Junior Class, both A. B. and B. S., study Inorganic 
Chemistry the first term, and Organic Chemistry and Chemical 
Philosophy the second term. The method of instruction is, in 
part, deductive with recitations from the text-book ; in part, 
inductive with laboratory work by the students ; and, in part, 
by lectures. 

Two objects are desired in this work — to instill into the 
students systematic methods of thought, thus disciplining their 
minds — and to increase their fund of knowledge, thus giving 
them a technical training. 

Special attention is given to the technology of minerals, ores, 
waters, air, and the ordinary articles of commerce. 

Candidates for the B. S. degree also devote ten hours per 
week in the laboratory to Analytical Chemistry and Mineralogy. 

First Term. — Qualitative Analysis and Crystallography. 
Second Term. — Quantitative Analysis by Volumetric and Gravimetric 
methods, and Determinative Mineralogy. 

The department will be equipped during the Summer with a 
laboratory containing individual desks, gas, water supply, etc. 

For illustrating Mineralogy, the University has a good col- 
lection of minerals, both classified and unclassified. 

Text-Books : Avery's Complete Chemistry ; Coit's Chemical Arith- 
metic ; Thorpe's Quantitative Chemical Analysis ; Wagner's Chemical 
Technology ; Remsen's Organic Chemistry, and Dana's Hanid-book of 
Mineralogy, 

All students in Chemistry and Physics will be required to 
pay a fee of five dollars for each of these sciences. 



:894»] MERCER UNIVERSITY, MACON, GEORGIA. 25 



APPARA TUS. 



The University has a good supply of apparatus with which 
to illustrate the various departments of Physics, namely : in 
Mechanics. At wood's Machine, Centrifugal Apparatus, Sets of 
Pulleys and Levers, Compound Pendulum, etc.; in Hydraulics, 
Hydraulic Press, Hydrostatic Bellows, Specific Gravity Appara- 
tus, Hydrometers, Water Wheels, etc.; in Pneumatics, Aneroid and 
Cistern Barometers, Marriotte's Law Apparatus, Queen's large 
Eotary Air Pump, with accessories, condensers, models of suc- 
tion and Force Pumps, Hero's Fountain, etc.; in Acoustics, 
Organ Pipes, Siren, Organ Bellows, etc.; in Optics, Porte 
Lumiere, Heliostat, Photometers, Mirrors, Prisms, Parabolic 
Eeflectors, Models of Eye, Spectroscope, Polariscope, Microscope, 
Stereopticon, etc.; in Heat, Pyrometer, Thermometers, Joule's 
Apparatus, Gay Sussac's Apparatus, Models for condensing and 
non-condensing Engines, Hygrometers, etc.; in Magnetism and 
Electricity, Magnets, Electro-Magnets, Functional Machine with 
accessories, Holtz' Machine, Dynamo, RuhmkoefFs Coil (2£ inch 
spark), Bunnell's set of Galvanometer, Rheostat and Bridge, 
Reflecting Galvanometer, Shunt Box, Magnetometer, Yoltmetre, 
Geissler's Tubes, Queen's New Plunge Battery, etc. 

The Chemical laboratory will be fitted with individual desks, 
water, gas, etc., and a full supply of apparatus and chemicals 
necessary for both theoretical and practical chemistry will be 
added. 

The museum contains Fossils, Rocks, Minerals. Ethnological 
remains and Biological specimens. The fossils consist of "The 
Willet collection of cretaceous Fossils," and various other 
specimens, representing most of the geological formations in 
Georgia and in other States. 

The minerals consist of the following classified sets: "The 
Pierce Collection" of five hundred specimens, from France and 
Germany; "TheShepard Collection" of six hundred aud fifty 
specimens, from various localities; "The J. Lawrence Smith 
Collection" of one hundred specimens from the United States; 
a set of one hundred specimens from the Smithsonian Institution ; 
a collection of six hundred specimens of Georgia minerals. 
Besides these, there are about one thousand specimens of uuclassi- 
fied minerals and rocks which will be classified as soon as possible. 



26 MERCER UNIVERSITY, MACON, GEORGIA. [1893. 



THE SCHOOL OF PEDAGOGY. 
Professor Moseeey. 



The constant demand made on Mercer for teachers, the great 
need of trained teachers, and the desire to widen the scope of 
the University's usefulness, induced the Trustees to establish 
this new chair. It is a recognized fact now that to know what to 
teach is only a part of a suitable preparation for teaching. With 
the knowledge of the subjects to be taught, there must go the 
tact and the power to control and communicate. These things 
can be taught, The difference between a trained teacher and 
one untrained is so great, that an enlightened public will not 
consider them in competition at all. 

In establishing this new chair, the Trustees aimed to meet 
a most urgent need in Georgia and the whole South. And when 
this school was thrown open to women, still further evidence was 
given that Mercer will not be behind the very foremost in meet- 
ing the reasonable demands of the people. It is the purpose of 
this department to convert the scholar into the teacher. 

In addition to furnishing a body of well trained teachers for 
the different phases of school service, the course will be presented 
in such a way as to form an essential element of a liberal educa- 
tion. Courses in the Science, the Art, and the History of Educa- 
tion will be arranged and announced from time to time. Courses 
in Psychology and the phases of Philosophy bearing a close rela- 
tion to Pedagogy will also be given. For the scholastic year of 
1894-'95, two parallel courses will be given. 



COURSES OF STUDY. 

Course i. Elements of Pedagogy, based on Page's "Theory and Prac- 
tice " and Payne's "Outlines of Educational Doctrine." 

Course 2. Elements of Psychology (Compayre), supplemented by 
lectures and parallel readings. 

Course 3. Compayre, " Lectures on Pedagogy." 

Course 4. Advanced Psychology. (Text-book selected later.) 



1894.] MERCER UNIVERSITY, MACON, GEORGIA. 27 



LECTURES ON PHYSIOLOGY AND HYGIENE. 
Professor Moore. 

However thorough aud complete the instruction, or high the 
curriculum, no education can be complete or well rounded, with- 
out some knowledge of Anatomy, Physiology and Hygiene. As 
a matter of fact, the cultivation aud development of the mind 
has possibly been pressed too often at the expense of the body, 
and our boys and girls have sometimes been sent out from our 
Schools and Universities with physical and nervous systems so 
wrecked as to require months and even years to regain their 
physical equilibrium. 

It is true that in most of the Schools and Colleges, calisthenics 
and the athletic sports have been encouraged and fostered, but 
even these, when improperly conducted, may result in harm 
rather than good. 

As a matter of accomplishment, every man ought to know 
something of the physical side of his life, and nothing can be 
more embarrassing among educated people, and in cultured and 
polite society than the mistakes and blunders often made by 
those with no knowledge of their anatomy. 

But it is more from a practical standpoint that the necessity 
for some teaching on this line arises. How often do emergencies 
occur where life itself hangs upon the knowledge, the coolness, 
and the discretion of those around, and, with a fair amount of 
education as to ones physical structure, many of these emergen- 
cies can be met and the ghastly reaper kept at bay until the 
services of a physician is secured. 

In view of these facts, the Board of Trustees have wisely 
decided to continue the chair of Anatomy, Physiology and Hy- 
giene, aud have re-elected Dr. K. P. Moore to take charge of 
this department. For two winters Dr. Moore delivered a course 
of lectures very acceptable to the Faculty and class, and we can- 
not too strongly emphasize the real benefit to come to our boys 
from these lectures. 

The lectures will be extended to fairly cover the ground 
covered by the subjects. 



2S MERCER UNIVERSITY, MACON, GEORGIA. [1893. 



SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY AND BIBLICAL LITERATURE. 
Professor GAMBREr.r.. 



The work in this department will be almost entirely in lectures. 
The Bible will be the text-book. The aim will be, in a reverent 
spirit, to cultivate an acquaintance with God's words. The lit- 
erature and general structure of the Bible will be discussed in 
outline. Special attention will be given to the inspiration of the 
Scriptures, with incidental remarks on the most important phases 
of the current discussions of the subject. 

After imparting a general idea of the Bible, the leading doc- 
trines of revelation will be discussed, and their relations, as 
parts of one great system of revealed truth, made to appear. 
In all this, God shall be his own witness. The scriptural rule of 
comparing spiritual things with spiritual will be constantly 
followed. 

The lectures on doctrines will be followed by a Bible study of 
Church Polity and Pastoral Duties. The course will close with 
a series of lectures on Preachers and Preaching. Care will be 
taken to make plain, by practice, the proper rules of interpre- 
tation. No attempt will be made to give a complete and techni- 
cal Theological course, but rather to put the student in the way 
of learning, at first hand, from the word of God, what he needs 
to know for practical work. 

It is hoped that many of our students will pursue a full course 
at the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. There will be 
given, beginning January 9th, 1895, a special Theological Course 
for ministers who cannot leave their pastorates permanently. 
This course will be made to suit men of all grades of culture, and 
will be adapted to the wants of brethren on the field and already 
engaged in the work. In the judgment of many of our wisest 
brethren, there is nothing within our reach that will help the 
churches so much, as to give to the pastors now in the work, a 
healthy stimulus, some practical help with the Bible, and some 
helpful suggestions as to the pressing and practical things of a 
pastors life. Churches will do well to send their pastors to this 
special school. Preparations will be made to care for all who 
come at a very reasonable rate. 



1894.] MERCER UNIVERSIPY, MACON, GEORGIA. 29 



A course of text-book reading will be suggested, running 
parallel with the lectures. All the lectures are to be noted, and 
the examinations on the course will be on these notes. 

Professor Murray will, if a sufficient number shall desire it, 
organize a class in New Testament Greek. By this arrangement, 
a year in Greek with him may stand for a year in Greek at the 
Seminary. The details of the work are to be arranged between 
Professor Murray, of Mercer University and President Broadus 
of the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. 



3o MERCER UNIVERSITY, MACON, GEORGIA. [1893. 



SCHOOL OF LAW, 



REV. J. B. GAMBRELL, D. D., President. 



Hon. EMORY SPEER, Judge U. S. Courts, Chairman. 

Constitutional and International Law and Federal Practice. 

Hon. JOHN P. ROSS, Judge City Court of Macon. 

The Principles of Evidence — Criminal Law and Practice — The Criminal Code. 

OLIN J. WIMBERLY, Esq., A. M., of the Macon Bar, 

Equity Jurisprudence — Pleading — Code of Practice. 

CLEM P. STEED, ESQ., A. M., of the Macon Bar, 

Common and Statute Latv—The Civil Code. 



LECTURERS : 
Hon. WALTER B. HILL, 

Lecturer on the Study of Law and Professional Ethics, 

Hon. C. A. TURNER, 

Lecturer on the Conduct of Causes. 
Dr. HOWARD J. WILLIAMS, 

Lecturer on Medical Jurisprudence. 



I894-] MERCER UNIVERSITY, MACON, GEORGIA. 31 



SCHOOL TERMS AND ADMISSION. 

The Fall term begins October 1st, and ends the day before 
Christmas. The Spring term begins January 2d, and ends with 
the College Commencement in June. It is expected that every 
student shall begin with the class in the Fall and continue regu- 
larly through both terms to be entitled to a diploma. No student 
can satisfactorily complete the required course of study in less 
time. Exceptions will be made in favor of an applicant who has 
had competent instruction, and who stands satisfactory examina- 
tions on the ground covered by the class prior to his application 
for admission, provided he applies not later than the opening of 
the Spring term. Every applicant must be sufficiently advanced 
in age and education to be able, with proper application, to 
comprehend the principles taught. 



COURSE OF STUDY. 



During the Fall term, the studies will be Blackstone's Com- 
mentaries and the related portions of the Code of Georgia, the 
Constitution of the United States and of Georgia, Criminal Law 
and Practice, and the Principles of Equity. 

During the second term, the combined study of Blackstone 
and the Code of Georgia will be continued, further studies of 
Constitutional Law, the principles of Equity Jurisprudence, 
Evidence, Pleading, Practice, and the completion of the Code. 

During this term, lectures on leading and important subjects 
of the law, and of its practice, will be delivered by prominent 
lawyers. Moot courts will be held by the class, and frequent 
practice will be given in drawing contracts, wills, pleading, and 
other legal forms and documents. It is desired to fit the student 
for the immediate practice of his profession as far as possible. 



MOOT COURTS. 



This valuable feature of a Law School will be encouraged, 
and as the students advance in their studies, opportunity will be 
given them in this way to apply their knowledge. A public 



32 MERCER UNIVERSITY, MACON, GEORGIA. [1893. 



Moot Court will be held at the Commencement in June, which 
will be conducted by the students under the direction of the 
faculty. The Moot Court held at the Commencement just passed 
was presided over by Judge Emory Speer, and proved to be one 
of the most interesting and profitable features of the course. 



RECITATIONS, EXAMINATIONS AND DIPLOMAS. 

Recitations of lessons assigned is the main method of instruc- 
tion, with comments and explanations by the Instructor. Exam- 
inations are given at intervals during the course, and are both 
oral and written. They are designed both as reviews and tests 
of the student's understanding of the principles he has been 
pursuing in his studies. The object of the whole course is to 
thoroughly acquaint the student with the reason and philosophy 
of established legal principles, and not to drill him in the mere 
repetition of legal phrases and maxims — the mere words of law. 

Students who satisfactorily complete the course receive a 
diploma with the degree of B. L. 



HONORS AND PRIVILEGES. 

Students of the Law School are entitled to the same privileges 
as other students of the University. They are eligible to mem- 
bership in the two literary societies, the Ciceronian and Phi Delta, 
and have access to the College Library and Eeading Rooms. 
Those not students in the University may arrange to pursue some 
one or more studies taught in the College departments. 

~No honors are awarded in this department, but speaker's 
places in the public moot court are supplied from the most pro- 
ficient members of the class, and the two who make the highest 
marks get speaker's places with the graduating class of the 
College on Commencement Day. 



1894.] MERCER UNIVERSITY, MACON, GEORGIA. 33 



TUITION AND EXPENSES. 



The Tuition in the Law Department is $60.00, payable $25.00 
on entrance, and $35.00 at the beginning of the Spring term. 

Expenses of the Course are about as follows : 

Tuition, whole course, $60.00. 

Board from $12.50 to $18.00. 

Washing, fuel, lights and stationery, per month, about $4.00. 

Books necessary for the Course, and Diploma, will cost from 
$25.00 to $35.00. 

These books are standard works and would form a valuable 
nucleus for a future library. 

A diploma from the Law School of Mercer University admits 
the holder to all the Courts of the country without further 
examination. 

For further information, address 

CLEM P. STEED, Esq., Secretary, 

Macon, Georgia. 



34 MERCER UNIVERSITY, MACON, GEORGIA. 1893. 



UNIVERSITY HIGH SCHOOL. 

Professor Holmes. 



This School is designed to prepare young men for admission 
into the College classes. The students are under the same regu- 
lations and enjoy the same advantages as in the University. The 
methods of instruction and the Courses of Study conform and 
lead directly to the University Curriculum, thus making the 
School a natural and easy door to the University. Students 
bearing certificates of proficiency from this School are received 
into the College classes without further examination, and the 
student who reaches the maximum in scholarship is entitled to 
certain privileges in the University. 

Any student deficient in the studies of any one School of the 
University, will be allowed to make these up in the High School 
and go on with his class in the other schools in the University. 



COURSE OF STUDY. 



Third Class.— Arithmetic ; Geography; English Grammar (primer); 
United States History ; Reading ; Writing ; Spelling ; Composi- 
tion ; Elocution. 

Second Class. — Arithmetic (Sanford's Higher) ; English Grammar 
(Whitney) ; United States History (Derry) ; Geopraphy (Maury's) : 
Easy Latin Lessons (Lindsay and Rollins) ; Gradatim ; Reading \ 
Writing ; Spelling ; Composition ; Elocution. 

First Class.— Algebra (Wentworth) ; Arithmetic, completed ; English 
Lessons (Lockwood) ; History of Rome (Creigton) ; History of 
England (Anderson) ; Latin Grammar (Allen) ; Latin Exercises 
Book (Allen) ; Eutopius ; Virgil ; Caesar ; White's Elementary 
Greek Lessons ; Anabasis ; Spelling ; Composition ; Elocution. 



i8 9 4-] MERCER UNIVERSITY, MACON, GEORGIA. 35 



HEARN INSTITUTE. 



PALEMON J. KING Principal. 

Rev. J. W. PULIvEN Assistant. 



This School, the property of the Georgia Baptist Convention, 
and the Preparatory School of Mercer University for North- 
western Georgia, is established in the beautiful and healthful 
village of Cave Spring, sixteen miles from Eome, on the East 
Tennessee, Virginia and Georgia Eailroad. Its situation among 
the mountains of Northwestern Georgia, at the head of the fer- 
tile and lovely Vann's Valley, its salubrious climate and excel- 
lent society, eminently fit it for a school center. 






ADVANTAGES. 

A Course of Instruction sufficiently extensive and carefully 
arranged ; firm, wholesome discipline ; thorough instruction, and 
cheap rates of board and tuition, are the advantages offered by 
this school to those who have sons to educate. 

Pupils bearing a certificate of proficiency from the Principal 
are admitted, without examination, to whatever class in Mercer 
University their certificates recommends them. 

A Boarding Department, presided over by the Principal, is 
connected with this School. The Boarding Department and 
school rooms are under the same roof. Hence, pupils boarding 
here are constantly under the supervision of the Principal, and 
are received and cared for as his own family. 

No intoxicating liquors have ever been sold in Cave Spring, 
and the charter of Hearn School, together with the charter of 
the town, prevents its sale in the future. 

A special practical Course of Study, including Book-keeping, 
is arranged for those who do not desire graduation. 



36 MERCER UNIVERSITY, MACON, GEORGIA. [1S93. 



EXPENSES. 



Board, including furnished room, bedding, fuel and lights, 

per month $10 0O 

Tuition, per month 3 00 

Pupils have their own washing done. 



The Hearn School gives tuition to five pupils each yeaiv 
The applicants must be of studious habits and excellent moral 
character. 

Special attention will be given to the Classics, and pupils may 
take extra lessons in order to perfect themselves in these and 
other Collegiate studies. 

Our attendance is larger than it has been in several years- 










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1894.] MERCER UNIVERSIPY, MACON, GEORGIA. 



39 



COURSES Of STUDY and NUMBER of LECTURES WEEKLY. 



CLASS. 


FOR 


(\. B. 


FOR B. S. 


fe 


English, 5. 




English, 5. 


< 

w 

05 

w 
Pi 

to 


Mathematics, 


5- 


Mathematics, 5. 


Latin, 5. 




Latin, 5. 


Greek, 5. 




Biology, 5. 




English, 4. 




English, 4. 


o 


Mathematics, 


4- 


Mathematics, 4. 


o 
W 

to 
o 


Latin, 4. 




Latin, 4. 


Greek, 4. 




French or German, 3. 




History, 4. 




History, 4. 



English, 4. 

Mathematics, 3. 

Latin, 3. 

Greek, 3. 

Chemistry, 3. 

Logic and Economics, 2. 

Physiology and Hygiene, 1. 



English, 3. 

Astronomy and Geology, 3, 

Latin, 3. 

Greek, 3. 

Psychology, 3. 

Physics, 4. 



English, 4. 

Mathematics, 3. 

Latin, 3. 

French or German, 3. 

Chemistry, 3. 

Logic and Economics, 2. 

Physiology and Hygiene, 1. 



English, 3. 

Astronomy and Geology, 3. 
Chemistry, 5. 
Mineralogy and Surveying, 2. 
Psychology, 3. 
Physics, 4. 



OTHER DEGREES. 

The degree of A. M. will be conferred on those students who, after 
taking the degree of A. B., shall continue their course successfully for 
one year in three departments of study, to be approved by the Faculty ; 
and the degree of M. S. upon those students who have received the 
degree of B. S. and shall continue their course in like manner. One of 
the three studies selected for the degree of A. M. or M. S. shall be a 
Major study, and upon some theme connected with this study, a thesis 
satisfactory to the Faculty will be required. 



4o MERCER UNIVERSITY, MACON, GEORGIA. [1893. 



GENERAL INFORMATION. 



Mercer University is beautifully located, fronting Tatnali 
Square, a park of twenty acres, in the city of Macon, Ga. Ma- 
con has a population of 35,000. The campus is ample, the situ- 
ation elevated and delightful. Macon itself is situated very near 
the center of Georgia, on the Ocmulgee river. The surface of 
the city is broken and picturesque. The drainage is easy, and 
will be as nearly perfect as could be wished when the sewer sys- 
tem now rapidly progressing in construction is finished. There 
are twelve outlets by rail, so that Macon is easily accessible 
from every part of the country. The society is stable, much 
of it to the manor born, and as elegant as can be found in all the 
South. There are two street car lines running by the University 
connecting with the general system in the city. 



CLIMATE AND HEALTH. 

Macon has a delightful climate. It is balmy and bright almost 
all the time. Snow and ice are rare. Many people find it a most 
desirable winter resort. Few cities offer more attractions to 
people in the vigorous regions of the North. During term time 
the change from the mountain regions to the milder climate, of 
Middle Georgia is not only agreeable, but very conducive to 
health. Taking the death rate of the white people in Macon 
by themselves, and it is only 9.41 per thousand a year. Grand 
Eapids, Michigan, is 9.55, a shade higher than Macon. Los 
Angeles, California, is 10, a shade higher still. For white people, 
Macon is the healthiest city in the United States, and putting 
white and black together it stands third in the list. 

The mean temperature for the year is 63.33°. The highest in 
summer for several years has rarely exceeded 90°, and the lowest 
in winter rarely below freezing. Macon is 380 feet above the sea 
level, and is on a site of hills, crowned with smoothe plateaus, 
dotted with beautiful homes and environed by fields of fruit and 
grain. The late Henry Ward Beecher said that Macon was pre- 
eminently the " Queen City of the South. " 

Students wishing to pursue their studies in a mild climate, 
under sunny skies, will find Mercer University an inviting school 
home. 



1894. ] MERCER UNIVERSITY, MACON, GEORGIA. \i 



BUILDINGS. 

The University has iu all ten buildings. The main building 
is four stories high aud contains thirty-four rooms. It was built 
at a cost of $100,000. The walls are unusually thick, the mate- 
rial and workmanship first class throughout. In this building is 
the President's residence, his office and reception room, the 
reading room, the museum, the laboratory, with the entire scien- 
tific department, lecture rooms, the two society halls, with the 
society libraries. The Chapel building is four stories high. The 
front contains large, airy and light lecture rooms, each one cap- 
able of accomodating from seventy-five to a hundred students. 
Each lecture room in both buildings is provided with a profes- 
sor's study connecting. In the rear of the Chapel building is 
the Chapel, a beautiful auditorium capable of seating 800 people. 
In the rear of the Chapel, and connected with it, is the Library 
of the University, with a capacity of twenty thousand volumes. 
There are two boarding halls belonging to the University and six 
framed buildings occupied by students. 



APPARATUS AND LIBRARIES. 

The apparatus is quite extensive, and well suited to illustrate 
the wide range of subjects taught in the scientific department. 
The Professor of Astronomy is assisted by the use of two telescopes 
of good power. Free use of apparatus is made in the scientific 
department. There are three libraries accessible to the students. 
The University library contains several thousand volumes, and 
each of the two literary societies has a fine collection of books. 
These, with the numerous publications sent to the reading-room, 
give students ample opportunities for reading. 



LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

In the University are two literary societies, the Ciceronian 
and Phi Delta. These are well conducted, and form the pride of 
the student body. Here the future great men of the country 
take their initial training in debate, learn to appear before their 
fellows, gain control of themselves while before an audience, 
and acquire ability to give and take, in good part, those thrusts 
which are sure to come in every public man's life. Great interests 
are taken in these societies, aud all that pertains to them. The 



42 MERCER UNIVERSITY, MACON, GEORGIA. [1893. 

halls are made beautiful, and the libraries, with their rich stores 
of books, are carefully kept. There is a geuerous emulation be- 
tweeu the two, but no hurtful rivalry. Every student is ex- 
pected to become a member of one or the other, and to take a 
part in carrying on that system of training so essential to the 
rounding out of a literary character. 



EXAMINATIONS FOR ADMISSION. 

All new students are expected to stand an examination for 
class grading. It is not intended in this preliminary examina- 
tion to be rigidly thorough, the object being to gain such knowl- 
edge as will enable each Professor to place the student where he 
can work to the best advantage. No student will be allowed to 
rise out of one class into a higher until he has stood his examina- 
tions and made the required mark. 



MA TRICULA TION PLEDGE. 

Every student before becoming a member of the University 
must sign the following pledge : 

" I hereby promise, upon honor, that I will conform to all the 
regulations and rules for the government of Mercer University, 
and will co operate with the officers in securing the enforcement 
of the same." 

This is not signed as a mere matter of form for entrance ; it 
is, at the start and continues to be, the bond of union between 
the student and the University. No student can enter without 
signing it ; no one can remain without keeping it. The regula- 
tions are few and simple, and can all be summed up in these few 
words : Every student must show himself a gentleman and a student. 
There is no place in Mercer University for rowdies nor idlers. 
The government is conducted on those principles necessary to the 
maintenance of a State. Honor is regarded as the basis of this 
government ; and fidelity is regarded as essential to the success- 
ful administration of all governments. No anarchial doctrines,, 
such as hold sway in many institutions, will be tolerated in Mer- 
cer. No secret understandings that students must uphold each 
other in disorder will be allowed. We recognize the solemn fact 
that we are training the future citizens of the commonwealth, 
even more, the future leaders of citizens, and therefore we must 



1894.] MERCER UNIVERSITY, MACON, GEORGIA. 43 

ground our students in the cardinal principles of civic life. If 
the future of the State is to be made safe, there must be whole- 
some discipline in the home and in the school. This is for the 
health of the individual, the home, the school and the State. 
We are gratified at the ready acceptance oi this wholesome doc- 
trine by the great body of Mercer students. Let it be settled 
that order must prevail, that faculty and students are united in 
a common purpose to maintain order, and the temptation to dis- 
order will disappear. 



RELIGIOUS HELPS. 

Better than all law is that strong and helpful influeuce ema- 
nating from a predominating religious sentiment in an institu- 
tion of learning. 

Mercer University is founded upon a belief in the existence 
and authority of God, and in the divinity of Jesus Christ. In 
its history it has recognized His claims and accepted the Bible as 
His revelation to man. It holds that the education of the mind 
cauuot with safety be separated from moral and religious instruc- 
tion. While sectarianism is not imposed upon any student, his 
denominational preferences being conscientiously respected, yet 
he is made to feel that God is the Maker and Sovereign, and that 
the Bible is the supreme standard of right, and to conform heartily 
to its teachings is the duty of every man. Hence, students are 
required to attend public worship on the Sabbath in the Churches 
of their choice, also the religious services which are couducted 
by some member of the faculty every morning in the Chapel. It 
is with pleasure that we record the fact that these services are 
cheerfully attended, and decently and reverently observed. A 
large majority of our students are orderly members of Evangel- 
ical Churches, and honestly endeavor to make their deportment 
consistent with their profession. The student of obscene and 
vulgar speech, or of base, irregular habits, must reform, or he is 
left alone by other students and brought under discipline by the 
faculty. 

" The Young Men's Prayer Meeting," a voluntary association, 
conducted by one of the students, is well attended, and is found 
to be helpful to those who are trying to lead godly lives. The 
" Mercer Missionary Society " is a voluntary organization com- 
posed of students, and has for its objects the dissemination of 
missionary information and the cultivation of the missionary 



44 MERCER UNIVERSITY, MACON, GEORGIA. [1893. 



spirit. The society also appoints religious meetings to be held 
on Sunday afternoons in destitute portions of the city. These 
engagements make a good training school, and many young men 
go forth imbued with a desire to do good, and by this practice 
are qualified for efficient service in other fields. 

There are also Young People's Unions which greatly strengthen 
those seeking to lead good lives and make way for co-operative 
labors for the saving of the lost and the reclaiming of the wander- 
ing. All diligence will be given to train not only ministers, but 
intelligent laymen for Christiau work The most approved 
methods of training will be adopted. It is confidently believed 
that by concentrating all these helpful influences on the student, 
with the divine blessing it will u be easy to do right and hard to 
do wrong." This is the perfection of discipline— the regulating 
power of moral and spiritual forces. 



RECITA TIONS. 

It is the constant aim of the Faculty to assign to each student 
as much work as he can do, and their constant care to see that 
he does it. Idleness, the bane of the student's life, is not toler- 
ated. If it shall appear in any case that a student has no heart 
for his work, and cannot be brought to a sound mind on the sub- 
ject, he is kindly sent home, to be received back, without preju- 
dice, when he gets up an appetite for study. The daily recita- 
tions afford ample opportunity to find out what the student is 
doing. 



ABSENCES. 



" A lost day" is hard to recover in any business ; but in a 
College Course it is often lost forever. And sometimes, days 
preceding are sadly compromised by the anticipation of the 
coming holiday, and then the days which follow are demoralized 
by the irregularities in which the student has been indulging. A 
continuous session, with suitable hours for rest and recreation at 
regular intervals, has been found to be most conducive to pro- 
gress and mental discipline. The Course of Study is arranged so 
as to require faithful and earnest application on the part of the 
student, and if he loses time he Mis behind his class, becomes 
heavily burdened with recitations which must be made up, and 
as a consequence he loses hope, and sometimes he drifts into a 



i8 9 4-] MERCER UNIVERSITY, MACON, GEORGIA. 45 

fatal carelessness. In view of these facts, the management dis- 
courages the multiplication of holidays, and begs the patrons not 
to invite or call their sons home, or give them permission to 
leave College for a day, except it be really necessary. Forego 
the pleasure of birthday dinners, Christmas festivals, and other 
social entertainments, aud encourage the student to adhere to his 
work. Besides the mental demoralization incident to these off- 
days, it often happens that the exposure, travel, excitement and 
diet bring on physical disorders that seriously impair the health 
of the student. There is loss of time, loss of standing in the class, 
loss of enthusiasm in study, loss of money expended in travel, 
loss of health from exposure and indulgence, and only a passing 
pleasure gained. The Faculty will arrange for all the recesses 
and holidays that can be safely and wisely allowed. 



REPORTS. 



Reports in general terms of the standing of each student will 
be made to the parent or guardian every quarter. Reports show- 
ing the exact standing will be made at the close of each term. 
Parents will thus be kept acquainted with the progress of the 
students, and their help is solicited in securing the best results 
and greatest success for the student. 



UNIVERSITY EXPENSES. 

No monthly tuition is charged, but a fee of $15.00 must be 
paid before entrance, on the short term, and $25.00 before en- 
trance on the long term. These are Matriculation fees, and 
must be paid before entering the recitation room. No deduction, 
on any account, can be made. 

There will be charged a speeial fee of $5.00 for experimental 
purposes in the Scientific Department. Only those in that de- 
partment will pay this fee. 

The Diploma fee is $5.00 for A. B. aud B. S., and $10.00 for 
each of the other degrees. 

These constitute all University fees, of whatever sort. 



46 MERCER UNIVERSI1 V, MACON, GEORGIA. [1893. 

BOARDING. 

Students bave a wide range of choice in selecting their board- 
ing place. Those who wish to do so can club, do their own 
cooking, and live on less than $5.00 a month. There are two 
University halls in which table board can be had at $9.00 a 
month. There are six cottages in which the hall-boarders room, 
furnishing and keeping their own rooms. Private families take 
boarders at $11.00 to $18.00, and furnish everything. There is 
perfect liberty as to the choice of ways to live, and students are 
not rated any where according to the boarding houses, but by 
their general conduct and class record. 



OTHER EXPENSES. 

' There is great difference in the amounts of money spent by 
college students. Our best students, as a rule, do not spend 
much money. Plenty of money is generally fatal to good work. 
Books will cost $10 or $12 a year, perhaps. The other expenses 
are as each student makes them. Parents ought to be careful not 
to supply their sons with too much money, and they ought to 
require a monthly accounting, which will be good business train- 
ing and a healthy restraint on the tendency of youth to be lavish 
with both money and time. 



SELECTING A SCHOOL. 

Thoughtful parents and considerate young men will be careful 
in selecting a school to patronize. They ought to be, for the 
school in a large measure makes the man. Every University 
develops a genius which it communicates to its students, and this 
in time shows itself in the character of the men educated. If the 
spirit is healthy and enterprising, while conservative and safe, in 
time the alumni of the institution will prove it by lives of strength, 
wisdom and success. Judged by her sons, Mercer University may 
well invite aspiring youth to her halls. Her hundreds of grad- 
uates are her commendation. They are among the leading men 
iu every calling. In statesmanship, the Governor of the State, 
the Secretary of State, and four out of eleven Congressmen 
in Georgia now are alumni of Mercer. Her sons are equally 
prominent in every other calling. And this is no accident. The 
traiuing in Mercer, combining mental with spiritual culture, is 



1894.] MERCER UNIVERSITY, MACON, GEORGIA. 47 



suited to make men, and men rule the world. A thorough- 
going Christian school can give the broadest, the safest and the 
best education on earth. We invite the patronage of those who 
wish such an education. 



A WORD TO TEACHERS. 

Teaching is a business. It is a means of great usefulness, and 
a means of personal profit. Good teachers secure good positions. 
The world is willing to pay for what it gets, and really does it, 
as a rule. Persons desiring to teach will consult their own 
interest by taking the course in Pedogogy now opened to men 
and women alike. There will be a Bureau of Information con- 
nected with the University to secure schools for trained teachers, 
and teachers for schools. Mercer is very desirous of being help- 
ful to education in general by training teachers, and securing 
schools for them where they can serve the people. 



THE FACULTY. 

Great care has been taken in selecting the present Faculty of 
Mercer. The culture of more than a dozen of the best Univer- 
sities in America and Europe is represented. Except the Presi- 
dent, every Professor is under thirty-six years of age, and yet 
each one has had practical experience in teaching. They are 
thoroughly united on every question connected with the Univer- 
sity, and are full of hope for the future of the institution to which 
they have consecrated their lives. And more, every teacher in 
Mercer is an active church member. 



CO-OPERATION. 

Parents sending their sons to Mercer are earnestly urged to 
frankly and frequently confer with the President as to their 
progress. If there are any difficulties in the way of achieving 
the best results, the President ought to know them. He will in 
all cases deal candidly with parents, and sympathetically, but 
faithfully, with students. The education of a son cannot cease to 
be a parental responsibility, because he has been sent away to 
school. The home influences, must combine with the school in- 
fluences to secure the best results. 



48 MERCER UNIVERSITY, MACON, GEORGIA. [1893. 



AID TO CERTAIN CLASSES. 

The Baptist Convention of the State of Georgia holds a fund 
for education distinct from the Endowment Fund. By this means 
young men of limited circumstances, who have been licensed for 
the Gospel Ministry, may be materially aided. Applications for 
the benefit of this provision should be made to E. Y. Mallary r 
Secretary of the Executive Committee, Macon, Ga. The appli- 
cant should forward evidence, from his Pastor and Church, of his 
character, capacity and calling. He shall also state how much 
aid he will need, for, since this fund is limited, it is necessary 
to practice economy in its disbursement. It is intended to help 
those who are doing their best to help themselves. Young men 
who do not show decided piety, and give proof of diligence in 
study and attain a fair standing in their classes, will not be re- 
tained upon the charges of this fund. Apt to learn, as well as 
" apt to teach," must be a qualification of the beneficiary. 

A fund, the bequest of Mr. James M. Gray, is held for the 
benefit of young men from Jones county. The following regula- 
tions have been adopted respecting applications for aid from this 
fund : 

1. Applications for the benefits arising from the Gray Fund 
must be addressed to the President or Secretary of the faculty, 
substantially in this form : 

I, , a young white man, of the age of years, of 

the county of , State of Georgia, respectfully ask to share 

in the provision made by the late J. M. Gray, of Jones county, 
Georgia, for the education of worthy indigent young men in Mer- 
cer University. I desire aid to the extent of being provided with 

, which neither of my parents are able to pay for, 

nor myself. 

[The last blank in the body of the application may be filled 
by inserting the words Matriculation Fees and Board, or either 
of these items, according to the need of the applicant.] 

2. All applications for the Fall Term (October-December) 
must be made by September 10th, next preceding, and for the 
Spring Term (January to June), by December 10th, next preced- 
ing. 

3. The applicant should be at least fourteen years of age if 
applying for the Freshmen Class, and of proportionately advanced 



1 8 9 4-] MERCER UNIVERSITY, MACON, GEORGIA. 49 

age if he aspires to a higher class. He must be prepared in scholar- 
ship afc least for the Freshman Class, or the first year in the Scien- 
tific Course. 

4. He must present the certificate of a committee consisting 
of the Ordinary of the County, the Chairman of the Board of 
County Commissioners, or Judge of the County Court, and one 
other respectable citizen of the county, testifying that the appli- 
cant is of good moral character, and unable to pay the expenses 
of his educatiou, as expressed in his application. 

5. The beneficiary, in every case, shall be decided by a com- 
petitive examination of all the candidates who are eligible under 
the provisions of the bequest, due notice of the vacancy having 
been given by the Secretary of the faculty. 

6. Applicants from Jones county shall, in all cases, have pre- 
cedence ; and to this end those from other counties shall be re- 
ceived for one year at a time, with the privilege of renewal from 
year to year, in case of a deficiency of applicants from Jones 
county. 

7. The bills for board and tuition must be properly made out 
and presented to the officer appointed for that purpose. 

The amounts allowed each full beneficiary are as follows : 
Thirteen dollars per month for board ; sixty five dollars per 
annum for tuition and incidentals. 

Beueficiaries under this fund will be expected to pay all they 
can towards their own expenses. The benefits of this fund are 
intended only for the poor and worthy, and parents of pupils who 
are able to pay all, or a part of their expenses must do so. Ben- 
eficiaries of this fund must show marked diligence, and make 
progress in their studies, or they will not be retained. 



MEDALS FOR 1895. 



MoMlOHAEL Medal. — Given by Mr. J. C. McMichael, editor 
Christian Index, Atlanta, Ga., and awarded for excellence in 
English Composition to some member of the Senior ('lass. 

The Trustees' Medals. — To be awarded to the first and 
second best declamers in the Sophomore Class. 

The McCall Medal.— Given by Hon. John G. McCall, for 
general excellence ; open to all Classes. 

The Cabaniss Medal. — Given by J. W. Cabaniss, Esq., to 
the best declamer in the Freshman Class. 

The Freeman Medal.— Given by Hon. A. D. Freeman, for 
excellence in declamation in the Sub-Freshman Class. 

The O'Kelly Medal.— Given by Rev. T. W. O'Kelly, for 
the best Greek scholar in the Junior Class. 

The Blalock Medal. — Given by Chas. Z. Blalock, Esq., of 
Atlanta, Ga., for the best Essay on the Progress and Advance of 
Science. Contest open to any student of the University proper. 

All correspondence concerning the University should be 
addressed : 

PRESIDENT MERCER UNIVERSITY, 

Macon, Ga. 



mm